Tag Archives: Magnets

Ice Cube Resin Magnets

12 Sep

According to my fabulous readers (and WordPress stats) one of the most popular posts on The BB Creative is my tutorial on how to make resin magnets.

Resin magnets are a very simple and easy craft. My previous post covers all the instructions for this quirky craft, but I wanted to share some photos with more detail on how to create these fun, ice cube shaped magnets. 

Step One – Gather Supplies

  • Hard plastic ice cube trays (polypropylene ice cube trays).
  • Castin’ Craft Casting Resin (I found this at Opus).
  • A container to mix the resin in (I used a left over glass jar).
  • Various odds and ends, for this batch of magnets I used: miniature clothes pins, embroidery thread, straight pins, old computer keys, paper clips, beads, paper flowers, plastic dragonflies, and fresh flowers.
  • Magnets.
  • Glue gun and glue sticks.

Step Two – Fill Ice Cube Trays

  • I recommend that you create this craft in a well ventilated area. The resin smells terrible. I worked on this craft outside on a beautiful, sunny afternoon. Perfect!
  • Please carefully read the directions for the casting resin. Stir the catalyst into the resin at the recommended ratio. Mix well (for at least one minute).
  • Pour a little bit of the casting resin into the bottom of the ice cube tray. Allow the resin to set.
  • Place your crafting supplies, trinkets, keepsakes, and miniature items into the ice cube tray on top of the set resin. Pour more resin in the ice cube tray until the trinket is covered.

Step Three – Allow to set & Enjoy

  • Allow to set completely (this will take several hours). Leave the tray outside or in a well ventilated area to set. It will smell.
  • Pop out your resin ice cubes. The resin will become more clear with time.
  • Hot glue a magnet onto the back and enjoy!

Resin Magnets Tutorial

17 Dec

I love magnets. I love the simplicity of magnets. They can add so much character and life to furniture and appliances that are not very exciting, like refrigerators or office cubicles.

Last Christmas my friend Courtney and I decided to do a homemade Christmas exchange. The only rule was that we had to use a craft medium or technique that we haven’t used before. I decided to experiment with craft casting resin.

Luckily my experiment was a success! I hope that Courtney likes her magnets, I certainly enjoy them. I made myself a handful of magnets for my cubicle at work and always get compliments on them. They are very unique and funky – I haven’t seen anything like them at the Christmas craft fairs.

Supplies:
•    Hard plastic ice cube trays (polypropylene ice cube trays)
•    Castin’ Craft Casting Resin (I found this at Opus)
•    A container to mix the rein in (I used a left over glass jar)
•    Various odds and ends: locks and keys, ribbon, embroidery thread, straight pins, crayons, beads, paper clips, dice, guitar picks, anything miniature that will fit in an ice cube tray.
•    Magnets
•    Glue gun and glue sticks

Directions:
This craft is pretty simple. Basically you put your trinkets in the ice cube tray, pour in the resin, and wait for everything to set! Please note that the casting resin used to make this craft has a very strong odor – please make this craft in a well ventilated area.

Step one: Read the directions for the casting resin. Stir the catalyst into the resin at the recommended ratio. Mix well. The catalyst precipitates a chemical reaction.

Step two: Pour a little bit of the casting resin into the bottom of each ice cube tray. Allow the resin to set.

Step three: Place your trinkets in the ice cube tray on top of the poured resin. Pour more resin in the ice cube tray until the trinket is covered. Allow everything to set completely (the directions from the casing resin will let you know approximately how long this will take).

Step four: Pop out your hard, transparent plastic objects. Hot glue a magnet onto the back of your new plastic cubes to create some super fun magnets!

You are done! A simple craft project that will definitely impress your friends.

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